EnneagramFourth Way Gurdjieff Ouspensky School Education Concerning the Work Teachings of G. I. Gurdjieff, P. D. Ouspensky, Maurice Nicoll, and their students.
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P. D. Ouspensky's Books

P. D. Ouspensky at age 34.

In Search of the Miraculous: Fragments of an Unknown Teaching

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The record of the author's intimate asociation with the mystic Gurdjieff, and his search for a system of universal knowledge. An astonishing record of the author's search for the meaning of human existence and of his eight years' work as the pupil of G. I. Gurdijeff, one of the 20th century's most profound and influential spiritual teachers.

A blurb on the back cover of this book reads: 'This Book will change your life.' Most cynics find such statements truly revolting. Those brave enough to take the challenge will find an introduction to a teaching, called The Work, which has been handed down from generations. A pupil of G. I. Gurdjieff, P. D. Ouspensky was responsible for bring much of his work to the English speaking world. Certainly the most engaging of the text written by the Russian mathametician and philosopher, this book belongs in every transcendentalist's library.

Ouspensky met Gurdjieff in Moscow in 1915. Published with Gurdjieff's approval after Ouspensky's death, this book is the precise, clear result of Ouspensky's long work in putting together in an honest and impersonal form those 'Fragments of an Unknown Teaching' which he received from Gurdjieff. A primary source for students of the work ideas.

This book was published two years after Ouspensky's death (1948) in England. Ouspensky's search for truth brought him in 1915 to his meeting in Moscow with George Ivanovitch Gurdjieff who revealed to him a system of knowledge which Ouspensky recognised as a vital need for mankind at the present time. This record of Ouspensky's eight years of work as Gurdjieff's pupil is to be compared with Plato's representation of the life and teaching of Socrates. Written with direct simplicity this book cannot fail to convey the impression that not only did he discover a real knowledge about Man and the Universe, but that a practical teaching for the conduct of life is even now in existence. These are no theories of philosophy or psychology, but a complete understanding of the problems of life and the most direct instructions for the betterment of man's existence. Ouspensky describes the conversations between Gurdjieff and his pupils with an exactness which conveys a vivid picture of two of the most extraordinary men of our generation and dramatically relates the story of the preservation of this teaching by Gurdjieff and his small circle through the period when Tsarist Russia was destroyed.

The Fourth Way: A Record of Talks and Answers to Questions Based on the Teaching of G. I. Gurdjieff

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Verbatim records of his oral teaching from 1921 to 1946 provide a comprehensive statement of the Work ideas as taught by P. D. Ouspensky; it gives a lucid explanation of the practical side of G. I. Gurdjieff's teachings.

The Fourth Way is the most comprehensive statement thus far published of the ideas taught by the late P. D. Ouspensky. Consisting of verbatim records of his oral teaching from 1921 to 1946, it gives a lucid explanation of the practical side of G. I. Gurdieff's teachings, which Gurdjieff presented in the form of raw materials, Ouspensky's specific task having been to put them together as a systematic whole. Just as Tertium Organum deals with a new mode of thinking, so The Fourth Way is concerned with a new way of living. It shows a way of inner development to be followed under the ordinary conditions of life---as distinct from the three traditional ways that call for retirement from the world: those of the fakir, the monk, and the yogi.

The Psychology of Man's Possible Evolution

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This book presents the definitive edition of Ouspensky's famous first series of five psychological lectures which preceded his second series of five cosmological lectures known as The Cosmology of Man's Possible Evolution. Together they form a complete whole view of man in the world. These lectures reproduce Ouspensky's own manuscripts and are in exactly the form he introduced these ideas between 1934-1940.

Studies man in view of what he may become. Describes how man must work simultaneously on his knowledge and his being to find inner unity. These lectures were intended by Ouspensky as introductory material for people interested in the work in England. This material is still unmatched as a brief statement of the work's psychological ideas.

Designed to be read aloud at weekly meetings of small groups of people interested in the work, they are almost a basic primer of Gurdjieff's psychological ideas on consciousness and spiritual development. They were constantly revised as new groups came into existence and took their final form only after Ouspensky moved from London to New York, where he continued to teach from 1941 to 1947. The psychology Ouspensky sets forth in these introductory lectures has existed in one form or another for thousand of years and, unlike modern psychology, studies man from the point of view of what he may become. Once a man realizes how little control he has over his reactions to external circumstances and internal stimuli, he may wish to find a way to become free of this mechanical way of living. Ouspensky describes how a man must work simultaneously on his knowledge and his being to find inner unity and why although his developments depends on his own efforts, this is very difficult to achieve without guidance from a school.

Tertium Organum: The Third Canon of Thought and a Key to the Enigmas of the World

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Ouspensky's first major work. The Third Canon of Thought and a Key to the Enigmas of the World. Translated from Russian. Introduction by Claude Bragdon. The Mystery of Time and Space; Shadows and Reality; Occultism and Love; Animated Nature; Voices of the Stones; Mathematics of the Infinite; The Logic of Ecstasy; Mystical Theosophy; Cosmic Consciousness; The New Morality; Birth of the Superman.

A New Model of the Universe: Principles of the Psychological Method in Its Application to Problems of Science, Religion, and Art

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This book is of encyclopaedic character and covers a wide range of subjects. It includes the idea of Esotericism; the problem of Superman; the Symbolism of the Tarot and systems of Yoga; the Fourth Dimension; the examination of the recent ideas of New Physics in the light of the author's system; Relativity; problems of Space and Time; the author's Model of the Universe; three dimensional Time; the Fifth and Sixth Dimensions. In connection with the latest psychological theories, a study of dreams and a sketch on hypnotism and suggestion are included; while an important section is devoted to Experimental Mysticism, describing specially induced higher states of consciousness, which establish the illusionary character of the phenomena of mediumship, so-called clairvoyance, trance states, and communication with the dead. There follows the author's impressions of the Sphinx, the Pyramids, the Taj Mahal. His views on the Gothic cathedrals and their builders are highly significant. Another section deals with the idea of recurrence of Time, an idea expounded by Pythagoras and Buddha, and here connected with mathematical explanantions. The last chapter considers the sex problem from an entirely new standpoint, namely, sex in relation to the evolution of Man towards Superman.

The Cosmology of Man's Possible Evolution

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Complementary to In Search of the Miraculous. This book presents the definitive edition of Ouspensky's series of five cosmological lectures which followed his famous first series of five psychological lectures known as The Psychology of Man's Possible Evolution. Together they form a complete whole view of man in the world. These lectures reproduce Ouspensky's own manuscripts and are in exactly the form he introduced these ideas between 1934-1940.

Talks with a Devil

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Ouspensky's novel exploring themes of human foibles. Introduced and edited by J. G. Bennett. Two stories, 'The Inventor' --- an allegory of man faced with the consequences of science and technology set in the US at the turn of the century --- and 'The Benevolent Devil', which takes place in Ceylon, where an English civil servant prepares to do battle for his soul. They were written just before Ouspensky met Gurdjieff and just after he had returned from the East, 'in search of the miraculous.' They examine the whole question of conscious evil and the view that humanity's chief error is believing that the material world is the only reality.

Letters from Russia 1919

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Letters written at the time of the Russian Revolution.

Symbolism of the Tarot: A Long-Lost Classic Resurrected

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